Assistant Director for Economic Development – Franklin County, Ohio

Nov 6, 2020 | Jobs

Franklin County, Ohio is looking for an experienced Economic Development Assistant Director to join our award-winning Department of Economic Development and Planning. This individual will provide vision and leadership in planning, directing, managing, and overseeing economic development programs and projects within the County with a specific focus on housing and infrastructure development. As the Assistant Director for Economic Development, the successful candidate will develop and lead Franklin County’s comprehensive economic development plan and associated programs.

Requirements Include: Master’s Degree in planning, public administration, or related field with five (5) of professional experience in economic or community development, housing programs, or related experience with two (2) years being in a supervisory role.

Starting Salary: $ 32.16 per hour depending on qualifications and experience

HOW TO APPLY
Download Application and complete job description from the Franklin County Human Resources Department: https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/franklincounty or alternatively, https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/franklincounty/jobs/2897253/assistant-director-economic-
development?pagetype=jobOpportunitiesJobs

Application Deadline: November 20, 2020

Franklin County Economic Development and Planning Website:
http://development.franklincountyohio.gov/

FRANKLIN COUNTY/CITY OF COLUMBUS
Situated in central Ohio, Franklin County covers 543 square miles and encompasses the City of Columbus. Franklin County is the 30th largest county in the country and the most populous county in the state with 1.3 million residents. County residents enjoy a high quality of life, relatively low cost of living, business friendly environment, and easy access to a wide variety of recreation, entertainment, and cultural amenities. The County has access to a young and well-educated
workforce, and more jobs have been created in this area than any other area in the state over the last few years. Franklin County is home to The Ohio State University and has become a paragon of economic diversity and growth with several Fortune 500 companies.

The City of Columbus is the county seat of Franklin County, as well as the state capital and the most populous city in the state. It sits at the confluence of the Scioto and Olentangy Rivers and features a well-kept, vibrant downtown core that has recently undergone rapid and massive redevelopment and economic resurgence. Columbus has been ranked one of the 50 best cities in America by BusinessWeek and was ranked the number one up-and-coming tech city in the country by
Forbes.

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