Building a SMART Community Brings Economic Success

Oct 12, 2017 | News, Newsletter

Nate Green.
Montrose Group.

Smart Communities embrace technology as the key to their economic future. The first step in building a smart community is defining the elements of a smart community and what the economic benefits are from achieving that status.

The economic benefits of becoming a smart community are substantial. Successful technology based economic development is a well-established, five drivers of regional economic success—along with advanced manufacturing, global trade, advanced services and energy. Successful regional technology economies are built on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics occupations. STEM occupations consist of nearly 100 specific occupations consisting of 6 percent of U.S. employment counting nearly 8,000,000 jobs. STEM jobs are high-wage positions paying on average $77,880 and only four of the 97 STEM occupations had mean wages below the U.S. average of $43,460. The creation of smart community operating systems for cities also suggests substantial economic gain. According to a study by Accenture, Smart City solutions applied to the management of vehicle traffic and electrical grids could produce $160 billion benefits and savings through reductions in energy usage, traffic congestion and fuel costs.

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Manufacturing Checklist Offers Insight into Food Ready Sites

When it comes to choosing a building or site, food manufacturers have unique needs. That means finding a suitable location can often be a challenge.

If you have a client looking for a suitable food site, here is a checklist containing site and building attributes you need to consider. Fortunately, Ohio has sites across the state that meet the needs of food and beverage companies making products used around the world.

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Building Partnerships Helps Communities Offer Transportation Systems that Impact Rural Quality of Life

Communities with no or limited access to public transportation still exist across rural Appalachian Ohio. Nationally, only 11 percent of rural residents report having access to transportation near their home, compared to 83 percent of central cities in metropolitan statistical areas. Whether it is access to transportation for Medicaid medical appointments, the need for senior citizens to get to the grocery store or other needs, limited resources can impact quality of life in a community.

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