Tracked Senate Bills – November 2021

Pending ARPA changes to expand and add new eligible uses of funds: Legislation currently under consideration in the Congress may serve to dramatically expand the eligible uses of ARPA funds. The proposed State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Fiscal Recovery, Infrastructure, and Disaster Relief Flexibility Act does not add new appropriations under ARPA, but rather frees-up funding for (i) those governments which had no or low revenue impacts from COVID-19, (ii) emergency funding related to natural disasters, and (iii) an expanded list of infrastructure projects.

Tracked House Bills – October 2021

State News:

New Loan Programs for Minority & Women-owned Businesses:  ODOD has added to its portfolio two loan programs to support minority- and women-owned businesses: the (i) Women’s Business Enterprise Loan Program and (ii) Ohio Micro-Enterprise Loan Program.  Included within the state budget bill (HB110, whose other elements are described in detail, below), the new program offerings are as follows:

Tracked Senate Bills – October 2021

Federal News:

Um, excuse me, is now an okay time to talk about inflation?  We have been reporting here during 2021 that consumer price index increases seen in year-over-year measures each month were not of concern to the Federal Reserve and most economists.  Um, that view may be changing as the Consumer Price Index rose 5.4% in September from one year ago.

Those same officials are worried as rapid price increases, seen each month for several months this year, has consumers paying more for meat, eggs, gasoline, furniture, and rent.  The latter cost – housing rent – has officials worried the most, as it is an important indicator of inflation and once rents increase, they tend to stay high for lengthy periods.

Tracked Senate Bills – September 2021

Federal News:

$1T federal infrastructure bill remains mired for next 6 weeks in U.S. House: The Senate-approved federal infrastructure bill has been in the House since August 10.  Having chosen to couple that measure with the larger so-called American Family Plan’s $3.5T economic policy bill, the House is facing intra-Democratic party divisions in the context of the latter, far larger piece of legislation.