There’s Still Time

Aug 31, 2020 | News, Newsletter

Grace Lukich
Ohio Development Services Agency

 

In light of the current health crisis, now is the time to take advantage of the ability to complete the Census online from home. We want all Ohioans to stay safe and get counted.

The Census 2020 count is coming to a close, but there are still many Ohioans that need to be counted.

The data from this Census is crucial for how Ohio will spend and operate for the next 10 years. It determines the distribution of billions of dollars to local schools, programs and public resources for the next 10 years.

The Census is a count of every person living in the United States. You fill out information like your name, birthday and address, and it typically only takes around 10 minutes to complete.

If you have not completed your Census, prepare for Census takers to visit in-person.  If visiting in-person, they will follow all CDC and local public health guidelines, including wearing a face mask. If no one is home, they will leave information about how to respond online or by phone.

Depending on location, some areas might receive phone calls, a paper questionnaire, or an email about the Census instead of a visit. Keep an eye for any Census communication!

To complete the Census online and for up-to-date information, please visit my2020Census.Gov.  The Census is easy to fill out, and accessible for people of all abilities.

You can fill out the form any time online or call the main phone line at 844-330-2020. Multilingual options are available online and through additional telephone lines listed here.

 

Be Counted Ohio: It’s easy, safe and important.

 

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