Earning and Maintaining Ohio Certified Economic Developer Credential

Jan 31, 2019 | News, Newsletter

Obtaining and Maintaining Your OhioCED Certification
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What is the OhioCED Credential?
The Ohio Certified Economic Developer (OhioCED) credential is designed to demonstrate the depth and breadth of an individual’s knowledge and their ability to apply that knowledge to the benefit of their community or organization. The Ohio CED designation also represents the economic development practitioner’s commitment to advancing the Ohio economy and elevating the economic development profession.

The Ohio Certified Economic Developer is a voluntary certification for practitioners who choose to demonstrate their advanced knowledge and training. To become a candidate for certification, an economic development professional must have successfully completed the Ohio Basic Economic Development Course or have three years of full-time economic development experience.

What is the process to obtain the OhioCED credential?
To become a candidate for certification, an economic development professional must have successfully completed the Ohio Basic Economic Development Course or have three years of full-time economic development experience.
To achieve certification, a candidate must successfully do all the following in a three-year period:
• Complete all Ohio Economic Development Institute Core Courses;
• Complete the Ohio Economic Development Institute Capstone Course; and
• Complete an additional 24 hours of approved elective continuing education or professional development, 12 of which must be from OEDA, over an 18-month period.
• Preapproved Training by other organizations may qualify for OhioCED credit. See preapproved training section below.

What OEDA programming is eligible for initial or continuing certification?
OEDA programming eligible for credit for certification (or continuing certification) includes the following:
• OEDA 360 (6 hours)
• OEDA Annual Summit (12 hours)
• Service on an OEDA Committee (4 hours)
• OEDA Webinars (1 hour)
• OEDA Workshops & Trainings (4-6 hours)
On a periodic basis, other OEDA programming will be held that will be eligible for credit.

What non-OEDA programming is eligible for OhioCED credit?
Pre-Approved Partner Programming
OEDI maintains partnerships with other economic development organizations that make their programming automatically eligible for OhioCED credit. Currently, programming offered by the International Economic Development Council (IEDC), the Council for Development Finance Agencies (CDFA) and the National Development Council (NDC) are eligible for credit. Over time, training by other organizations may be added to the list of preapproved training.
In general, a full day partner programming is eligible for four credit hours. Two- or three-day partner programming is eligible for eight credits.
Obtaining certification from any of these partners is eligible for a one-time OhioCEd credit of 16 hours.
Contact OEDI for a full list of OEDA and Partner Programming and credit hours offered.

Non-Preapproved Programming
Students participating in other organizations’ programming may seek approval for OhioCED credit. Obtaining credit requires the student to submit evidence that they have completed the programming. In general, evidence includes 1) a copy of the course agenda and 2) evidence of registration (such as a paid receipt, acknowledgement of registration, certification or a form completed by the training organization).
Contact OEDI for a Non-Preapproved Credit form.

What is the Certification Capstone Course?
At the completion of all required courses certification candidates will complete a final capstone project. The capstone project is a culminating experience that represents the application of multiple competencies into a final project specific to the community or communities in which the economic developer works.
An ideal capstone project will integrate aspects of core courses (e.g., real estate, finance and incentives, site selection and development, business retention and expansion, etc.) to address a community need or economic development challenge. Flexibility will be provided to participants to ensure the project best meets their community’s or organization’s needs.
Suitable projects include, but are not limited to, the creation of site development improvement plan, the preparation and execution of a business retention and expansion strategy, the creation of a strategic plan, or the evaluation of an economic or community development program within the developer’s community. Capstone projects will be approved by OEDA and Ohio University and participants will work in partnership with an OEDA mentor on the project.

What requirements are necessary to maintain your OhioCED Certification?
Once certified, a person must complete 16 hours of approved continuing education each calendar year, eight of which must be from OEDA, to maintain certification. (See Preapproved Training above)
Approved OhioCEDs are required to complete an annual certification survey, which will be mailed on an annual basis in January of each year.

Are the OEDI courses only for people who want to get certified?
The OEDI, with its four core courses and capstone course are the pathway to certification for those choosing to pursue the credential. However, you do not need to be working toward certification to take the courses. Likewise, you do not need to take the full sequence of courses though they are designed as part of a comprehensive curriculum that provides economic developers what they need to know to be successful in Ohio.

Do you have to become certified?
The Ohio Certified Economic Developer is a voluntary certification for practitioners who choose to demonstrate their advanced knowledge and training. The Ohio CED designation also represents the economic development practitioner’s commitment to advancing the Ohio economy and elevating the economic development profession.

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